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FROM THE JOB FRONT

FROM THE JOB FRONT is EmplawyerNet's monthly newsletter covering the latest developments in the area of legal employment -- and a few other things. FROM THE JOB FRONT is published as a service of EmplawyerNet, the online interactive legal employment network.

JULY 2001

NEWS FROM THE JOB FRONT

Dot Commers Coming Back to the Firm - If They Can

Bad Economy Good for Law School Admissions

Law Students Have Big Expectations

Legal Internet Sites Feeling the Pinch

OTHER FEATURES

Legal Trivia

Quote, UnQuote

One More Thing Before You Go


DOT COMMERS COMING BACK TO THE FIRM - IF THEY CAN

Not so very long ago, it seemed like almost all lawyers were trying to leave their law firms to work for Internet companies. Those unable to leave were envious of those who made the jump. Now, it seems like most of those who did leave are trying to jump back to their law firms. One Northern California legal recruitment firm reports that approximately half of its current list of candidates are former law firm lawyers trying to make their way back after stints at dot coms. A recruiter for the country's largest legal recruitment firm says "there are droves of people trained by Silicon Valley or San Francisco firms who went in-house and now are having a hard time finding a job." Making the job hunt difficult are the slow down or complete stop of corporate attorney hiring, the scarcity of in-house positions and the resentment that may exist due to the circumstances under which some attorneys left to go in-house.

The Recorder

BAD ECONOMY GOOD FOR LAW SCHOOL ADMISSIONS

Another place former dot comers are headed is law school, sparking increased applications for admission. "Several years ago, it was aerospace engineers," said one law school director of admissions. "Other times, applicants come from certain parts of the world, and you know something bad is happening there." Now, he says, law schools are seeing a sharp increase in applications from people leaving the technology sector. It is typical for law schools to see a jump in applications during the early stages of a bad economy. Examples this year include UCLA that has experienced an eight percent increase. The University of California, Boalt Hall has had a seven percent increase. Other law schools report double digit increases this year over last.

Daily Journal

LAW STUDENTS HAVE BIG EXPECTATIONS

It's no wonder so many more people are turning to law school when they have such high expectations of what it will bring them. A recent survey of 700 law students found that almost 50 percent of all first-year law students expect to make more than $125,000 a year upon graduation. Interestingly, only 17 percent of third-year law students expect to make that much. Over 600 of the participants in the survey say they expect to work at a law firm upon graduation while only 22 expect an in-house position. The number expecting to work in-house increases five fold when third-years are asked where they will be working five years out of law school. The most interesting finding is that 573 of the 700 students surveyed say they expect to leave the legal profession.

Corporate Legal Times

LEGAL INTERNET SITES FEELING THE PINCH

Websites serving the legal profession are among those suffering due to the change in the Internet economy. The client-law firm matchmaker USLaw.com, for example, recently had a major round of layoffs. The company received $10 million in private financing just about a year ago. Pro2net.com, a content site for lawyers and accounts has shut its doors. So has Red Gorilla, a time-and-billing vendor. eAttorney.com, a Web-based practice management and recruitment company laid off almost a quarter of its workforce late last year. There have also been major layoffs at the content and e-services provider law.com.

AmLaw Tech

LEGAL TRIVIA

According to the US State Department, there were 539,000 criminal trials last year in China. In what percentage of those cases was the defendant found guilty?
  
(a)Less than 1 percent
(b)30 percent
(c)60 percent
(d)Over 90 percent

(Answer at the end of the newsletter)

QUOTE

"In the end, the institution was vindicated."

    --The Dean of Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law after three students sued the school for dismissing them on academic grounds, gained readmission but then withdrew from the law school

UNQUOTE

ONE MORE THING BEFORE YOU GO...

The not-for-profit Osias Foundation is offering a $25,000 law school scholarship to a woman "who embodies the personal philosophy and career ideology" of Ally McBeal. Applicants must demonstrate how the use of "femininity" and "application of sexual tension" have helped them in cracking the glass ceiling that impedes women in the workforce.

  • Trivia Answer:

      Less than 1 percent. In fact, far less than one percent. There were only 90 convictions in the 539,000 cases.


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